PACKING LIST

What do I need to Bring on my multi-day kayaking adventure?

Kayaking is an outdoor activity and the part of the world you will be visiting is identified as being within a Temperate Rainforest. Our summer daytime highs are rarely much over room temperature and our nighttime lows can be described as cool. It also rains on occasion, sometimes for extended periods.

If you are familiar with spending time outdoors then you are likely already equipped with most of the clothing and accessories that you will need to bring with you. Likewise, you are aware that cotton is not your friend when there is any chance of getting wet.

We recommend that you bring two sets of clothing for your kayaking tour. One set that you will primarily wear while paddling. This should consist of layer-able clothes that will cope well and remain comfortable should they get damp or even wet. The second set of clothing is for around camp and should be selected to keep you warm and cozy during the evening. Again layers provide maximum flexibility. Avoid jeans and cotton shirts or sweaters, as once they get damp they can be very tough to dry and provide you with minimal residual warmth. If you can stick with synthetic quick dry materials or wool for your clothing, you will likely have a much better experience in our wilderness.

WHAT YOU NEED WHILE ON THE WATER

  • For your head; A Hat, cap or tuque – something with a peak or brim is ideal in the rain.
  • For your upper body; A base layer, a long sleeve mid-layer and a light Fleece or other warm non-cotton sweater.
  • For your lower body; Non cotton underwear & shorts or long pants – long synthetic or wool underwear under shorts can be a great combination.
  • For your feet; Wool or synthetic socks – bring a few pairs, your feet will get wet. Water shoes or sandals. Rubber boots can also be good unless you have big feet.
  • Consider a pair of quality, light-weight rain pants. Frequently you will sit on something wet.
  • Gloves – Look for paddling or cycling gloves to keep hands dry & blister free.

 WHAT YOU NEED WHILE AT CAMP

  • Your normal outdoor camping wear will typically work fine but remember it is always cooler near the water. Synthetics and wools are again better than cotton.
  • We provide you a jacket for paddling but bring rainwear or other outdoor jacket to wear at camp.
  • A base layer, a long sleeved mid-layer and a warm sweater, sweatshirt/hoody or outer layer fleece. Warm pants. Bring one layer more than you think you need!
  • Hiking shoe or running shoe & warm wool socks. Do not bring thongs or flip-flops.
  • Warm nightwear & a Pillow Case (to stuff with clothes, etc. for your pillow)
  • When we have campfires, they frequently emit sparks; consider bringing an old top layer.

 COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE ITEMS

  • A water bottle.
  • Camera and binoculars.
  • Small hand towel and a face cloth.
  • Sunscreen, lip balm & bug repellant.
  • Sunglasses and a retainer
  • Head Light (for reading in your tent and to light your way to the washroom)
  • Book/magazine, writing materials or other personal entertainment.
  • Personal toiletries (toothpaste, toothbrush, hairbrush, biodegradable soap, feminine hygiene products, etc.) – A packet of Wet Wipes works great to help personal hygiene.
  • If bringing any electrical/ electronics, bring spare batteries or a portable recharging unit. There are no power outlets.
  • If you must bring your phone, consider investing in a waterproof case for it.
  • If you have allergies for which you carry an EPI Pen – Bring it!
  • An extra set of any essential medication and correctional lenses.
  • Alcohol and/or Pop. We do not supply this and there are no stores after we leave Telegraph Cove. The general store in Telegraph Cove sells beer, wine, spirits & pop.

Please try to avoid bringing too much as space is limited.

SLEEPING BAG

If you do not have your own sleeping bag or prefer not to bring it, we have one pre-packed for you to use at no charge. Our bags are cleaned after every use and are rated to 0°C (32°F) or lower.

If you choose to bring your own sleeping bag, please make sure it has no cotton in the lining and that it has a compression style stuff sack. Place a garbage bag inside the compression sack and stuff your sleeping bag inside the garbage bag, inside the compression bag. Squeeze out the air, twist the neck of the garbage bag to keep out any moisture and close the compression stuff sack.

DID WE MENTION TO AVOID COTTON?

Honestly and joking aside, we cannot overstate this. Once cotton gets wet it stays that way and provides minimal residual warmth. Synthetic materials and better yet wool, are your best bet.

Do not forget to check the label on your underwear, virtually everything you choose to sit on will be damp. Wet cotton next to your skin will become very unpleasant very quickly; ask any toddler.

How to Pack for my Multi-Day Kayak Tour

We provide you two dry bags; one 10 and one 20 litre bag per person. When you arrive in Telegraph Cove before your trip, please feel free to come pick them up so you can pack in the comfort of your room.

The 10 litre dry bag will be your day bag, in other words the bag you will have access to on the water. We suggest you put the following items in your day bag:

  • Small camera and/or binoculars – If bringing a large or expensive camera, see below.
  • Extra sweater
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen & lip balm

The 20 litre dry bag will be your overnight bag, put things in here that you will want once you get to camp and won’t need access to on the water.

  • All camp clothes and spare clean, dry paddling clothes
  • Personal toiletries.
  • Towel, book/magazine
  • Head light, spare batteries, car keys, money & travel documents, etc. Place these items in zip-lock bags for extra protection.
  • Do not put shoes, rain jackets, drinks, etc. in the dry bag.

Do not fill the dry bags more then 3/4’s full in order to properly close them, squeeze all the air out, roll the top over itself 3 times and do up the buckles. Your bags will now keep your belongings dry!

How to pack my Camera

Salt water & DSLR can spell trouble if not looked after. What to carry it in becomes a compromise between ease of access and security. The most secure way to carry it is in a hard shell waterproof case; an otterbox for instance, however this can be difficult to stow and awkward to open while on the water. Next best would be a good quality dry bag. Take your camera with the lens you expect to use to a good outdoor store and find a dry bag that fits your camera well, but leaves enough room for you to get your hands in and around it. There also needs to be enough room to have a small super absorbent cloth so you can ensure your hands are dry when inserting and removing the camera. Both these options would have the camera and case strapped to the deck of the kayak under bungee lines. Consider adding a carabiner or similar locking mechanism to ensure the container remains secure.

When you want to take a photo, you remove the camera from its protection, take the photo, replace the camera and reseal it. Never put it down on the spray skirt or kayak deck. We usually recommend against changing lenses while on the water.

It is also worth checking your home or travel insurance policy. Most camera equipment can be covered for loss or damage by this policy. You may need to register serial numbers, etc. with the insurance company.